4 Coronavirus Stories Worth Reading Right Now

4 Coronavirus Stories Worth Reading Right Now

Every week, we corral wellness stories from around the internet. This week, we chose four to help you stay informed about the novel coronavirus.

(For updates and more about bolstering your immune system, we’ve also rounded up some tips and tools that can generally support our well-being, along with resources from the World Health Organization and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that you can turn to for more timely updates.)

  • Cancel Everything

    Cancel Everything

    The Atlantic

    In the absence of a vaccine for COVID-19, social distancing—limiting contact with others and avoiding public places—is the most viable way to prevent the spread of the disease. Taking personal measures to limit the spread also helps to avoid overburdening our healthcare system, where tests and beds may soon become limited. Work from home (if you can), cancel unnecessary travel plans and events, and please wash your hands frequently for 20 seconds at a time—for your health, for your loved ones, and for the vulnerable people in your community.

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  • How Long Will It Take to Develop a Coronavirus Vaccine?

    How Long Will It Take to Develop a Coronavirus Vaccine?

    The New Yorker

    With the spread of COVID-19 in the United States, pressure is on drug developers to push out a safe and effective vaccine in record time. But political voices calling for a vaccine to become available in the next few months are misinformed about what it takes to build one. New Yorker staff writer Carolyn Kormann reports on what challenges we’ll face in the process.

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  • As Coronavirus Closes Schools, USDA Offers Limited Help to Kids Who Rely on School Meals

    As Coronavirus Closes Schools, USDA Offers Limited Help to Kids Who Rely on School Meals

    As schools are shutting down in response to the coronavirus pandemic, many students are losing more than just classroom time: They’re also potentially missing their primary source of food. The USDA is responding by implementing the meal programs they usually deploy during summer breaks, and several states have waived the usual requirement that kids eat those meals in a group setting. Still, several factors limit students’ access to these programs—and it’s further proof that in a health crisis, low-income families almost always take the bigger hit.

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  • What Does the Coronavirus Do to the Body?

    What Does the Coronavirus Do to the Body?

    The New York Times

    COVID-19 is a contagious respiratory illness that can range from mild to severe with symptoms such as fatigue, fever, and cough, and a diagnosis can be tricky without a test. As new information becomes available, our understanding of it may change, including its severity and how far it will spread. Here’s what scientists know so far about how the novel coronavirus infects our bodies. (For more information on the COVID-19 outbreak, The New York Times has lifted its paywall for related content.)

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